Welcome to iGLOBES

Interdisciplinary Global Environmental Studies

iGLOBES is a CNRS - ENS/PSL University - University of Arizona research center, created to establish a hub of collaborative interactions between the French scientific community and UA researchers, fostering innovative interdisciplinary research on global environmental challenges. For more information...


iGLOBES ACTIONS AND RESEARCH

 COVID-19 IN THE AMERICAS OR COVID-AM: A BLOG

COVID-19 RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA


iglobes NEWS And EVENTS

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS FROM THE FRENCH INSTITUTES FOR ADVANCED STUDY FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

 

Deadline: September 15, 2020 3:00 pm (Paris, France time). 

 

The French Institutes for Advanced Study Fellowship Program offers 10-month fellowships four Institutes in France. It welcomes applications from high level international scholars and scientists primarily in the fields of the social sciences and the humanities (SSH). 31 positions are available for the 2021-2022 Academic Year in Paris (17), Lyon (5), Marseille (6), Montpellier (3).

 

The call is open to all disciplines in the SSH and all research fields. Research projects from other sciences that propose a transversal dialogue with SSH are also eligible. The minimum requirement is a PhD + 2 years of research experience at the time of the application. Exception will be made for scholars with a Master + 6 years of full-time research experience after the degree (PhD training will not be considered in the calculation of experience). 

 

UA researchers with ties to iGLOBES are well positionned for these fellowships. For more information about the program and the application process. Please contact us if you have questions or need help.

DOCTORAL CONTRACT IN PARIS, FRANCE ON "THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE MODELING OF LIFE AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF ARTIFICIAL LIVING SYSTEMS"

Location: Laboratoire d'anthropologie sociale in Paris, France & iGLOBES in Tucson AZ for fieldwork research at Biosphere 2. 

Contract Period: 36 months

Published on: June 25, 2020

Start date of the thesis: October 1, 2020

Salary: 2 135,00 € gross monthly

 

The thesis aims to develop a typology of the projects of life modeling and construction of artificial living systems, according to whether they build systems around human needs or design non-humanized environments. From the perspective of the Anthropology of Life and of the Science & Technology Studies, the candidate will examine the techniques used to objectify the characteristics of life, by reproducing its functioning. The types of social interactions that develop around –and within– these technical devices, the influence of socio-historical contexts, the role of mathematical formalization, the intervention of robotic and artificial intelligence systems, the types of chemical and biological processes mobilized to experiment with evolutionary phenomena will be the subject of an interdisciplinary investigation to identify conceptions of life as it is –but also as it may be, with recent advances in the field of astrobiology also being mobilized. For more information and to apply.

June 10, 2020

DAVID BLANCHON PRESENTS HIS BOOK "GEOPOLITICS OF WATER: BETWEEN CONFLICTS AND COOPERATION".

Water is a resource often compared to oil, and a shortage of water would lead to an imminent "water crisis", permanent, local and global. From this alarming assessment to water wars, as predicted by some, is only a step away. And yet, the role of water in conflicts is debated. Though it exacerbates them, it is rarely the main reason, and can even be a cooperation tool if peace is sought. More than a "water crisis" because of a natural shortage, water geopolitics is governed by failing water policies, and by the hardship of maintaining hydraulic security, with global warming compounding the issue. But there are solutions to a "new water culture", but they still need to be put in place.

May 22, 2020

CO-EVOLUTION OF PRIMITIVE METHANE-CYCLING ECOSYSTEMS AND EARLY EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE AND CLIMATE

 

Biological activity may deeply influence Earth’s climate. But all along its long history, this influence is still misunderstood. An interdisciplinary team, financed by the PSL project “Origins and Conditions for the Emergence of Life” (OCAV) and composed of researchers from the Paris Observatory, the Biology Institute of ENS (Ecole Normale Supérieure) and UMI iGLOBES at the University of Arizona, show that on primitive Earth, the evolution of methane cycling microbes influenced the stability of the climate early on, the glacial cycles, and therefore the planet’s habitability. This new approach, coupling atmospheric composition modelization over a long-term period with the evolution of ecosystems, opens new perspectives in the study of the habitability of planets and their moons, and of terrestrial exoplanets. 

 

Co-written by Boris Sauterey, Benjamin Charnay, Antonin Affholder, Stéphane Mazevet, and Regis Ferriere, you can read the full article in Nature Communications.