Welcome to iGLOBES

Interdisciplinary Global Environmental Studies

iGLOBES is a CNRS - ENS/PSL University - University of Arizona research center, created to establish a hub of collaborative interactions between the French scientific community and UA researchers, fostering innovative interdisciplinary research on global environmental challenges. For more information...


iGLOBES ACTIONS AND RESEARCH

 COVID-19 IN THE AMERICAS OR COVID-AM: A BLOG

COVID-19 RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA


iglobes NEWS And EVENTS

FRANÇOIS-MICHEL LE TOURNEAU'S CANOE EXPEDITION IN FRENCH GUIANA TO BE BROADCASTED ON TV THIS MONTH

 

In 2019, CNRS geographer and UMI Deputy Director François-Michel Le Tourneau paddled through history: first going the same way the 1st French expedition went in 1674, then by following the migration route the Natives took. Accompanied by the military unit the French Foreign Legion, a photojournalist and another CNRS researcher, the expedition enabled them to gain a deeper knowledge of regional territorial control and observe clandestin activities and biodiversity. Go back and read about this in our 2019 News and Events from May 17 to July 7.

 

From October 26 to 29, the French TV channel Outre-mer La 1ère will be showing this expedition in a 4 part series entitled "French Guiana, on the trail of illegal gold miners" and on October 30 the documentary done by the photojournalist Vincent Wartner. It will also be broadcasted on November 19 on the channel France 3.

October 6, 2020

RESEARCH PROJECT ON MODELING THE EVOLUTION OF BACTERIA IN THE OCEAN

 

During his stay at iGLOBES early Spring of 2020, Philippe Chérabier, a PhD student at the Biology Department of Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, worked on his project, modelization of the evolution of heterotrophic bacteria in the ocean. Because of their abundance and the speed of their evolution, we believe their evolution plays an essential role in the carbon cycle response of the ocean to climate change, and the global models used today do not take this into account.

 

Left image: details the energy flows of the model being studied.

Right image: shows the difference between an ecological model and an evolutionary model when looking at the effectiveness of the biological pump.

October 5, 2020

SOUTHERN ARIZONA'S CIENEGA WATERSHED: A SENTINEL TERRITORY

 

Financed by the iGLOBES' Man-Environment Observatory project, UA Senior Lecturer Adriana Zuniga-Teran compiled data from partners and analyzed the 21 indicators to determine the state of the Cienega Watershed. She presented the results on September 18, 2020.

 

The Cienega Watershed contains one of the last year-round running creeks of Southern Arizona and some of the rarest habitats of the Southwestern U.S. including cienegas (marshlands), Sacaton grasslands, cottonwood riparian forests, mesquite bosques. It is also a popular recreational destination for urban residents and the home of valuable archaeological sites. The Cienega Watershed can be considered a sentinel territory since the opening of the Rosemont copper mine will impact more than 5,000 acres of land, as well as 40 acres of washes that will be used to store dredged and fill materials. These impacts can be considered tipping points for many ecological and social processes within the Cienega Watershed, mainly because the mine’s operation threatens the scarce water resources in terms of quality and quantity. Stakeholders concerned with the impacts of the mine on the natural and cultural resources came together and created the Cienega Watershed Partnership (CWP), a stewardship non-profit organization that works to monitor the health of the watershed before the mine starts its operations. Through this effort, stakeholders have developed a set of indicators to identify and measure the subtle changes that will come as a consequence of mining.